I've been around for a while now.

We’ve been hard at work this summer adding on to our digital collection of WWII-era yearbooks, See You Next Year: High School Yearbooks from WWII. In addition to being a great classroom tool to teach students about using primary sources, these yearbooks provide a unique perspective on WWII, allowing visitors to experience the setbacks and triumphs of the war through the eyes of America’s youth.

Dunbar High School in Dayton, OH

Named after the late 19th century poet and Dayton native, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School was initially intended to be a middle school, but soon admitted high school students as well due to its immediate popularity. Dunbar followed in the tradition of America’s first all-black high school in Washington, D.C., with which it shares a name. The school also served as a center of employment for African American teachers, who often found themselves unemployed after completing teacher training due to the preference for hiring white teachers. Emphasizing that separate truly is inherently unequal, Dunbar’s yearbook more closely resembles a pamphlet in its design; there are no individual student portraits, no extravagant prom photos, and it is smaller than yearbooks at white high schools, measuring at less than 8×10 inches.

Moses Brown School in Providence, RI

Founded in 1784, the Moses Brown School is one of the oldest preparatory schools in the US. Its founder and namesake, Moses Brown, was a Quaker abolitionist and started the school to educate other young Quakers. While originally co-ed in accordance with the Quaker belief of gender equality, the school became boys-only in 1926, and would remain so for 50 years. The yearbook itself was put together during America’s earliest official involvement in World War II, and went to print several months after the attack on Pearl Harbor. A thorough class history documents the fear and confusion students felt, and discusses how faculty became air-raid wardens. While the school’s Quaker tradition was anti-war, many students ultimately joined the military. The school would also hire many veterans after the war to serve on their faculty, several from nearby Brown University, where many local Providence veterans used their GI Bill to earn a degree.

And thanks to the generosity of two of our Museum volunteers, we’ve also added new yearbooks from Albert Lea, MN and our homebase, New Orleans, LA!

Albert Lea High School in Albert Lea, MN

Albert Lea was a small town during World War II, with a population of just over 12,000 people, and truly felt the effects of so many young men and women leaving to enter the military or seek employment in industrial cities. Many of the boys left school mid-year ‘in order to preserve the four freedoms.’ By the end of the 1945 schoolyear, more than 30 Albert Lea High School alumni were killed in action, with many more like Museum volunteer Ross Gamble still set to enter the Armed Forces. In addition to the personal losses, the same Home Front issues impacted the students daily; ‘rationing makes the food problem difficult,’ says the caption next to her portrait, ‘but [cafeteria chef] Mrs. Mable R. Crynes continues serving nutritous and inexpensive meals.’ Students held war bond drives each week, and gathered supplies to donate boxes to the Red Cross. Additionally, many boys took part time jobs at the local post office during school holidays to assist in getting packages overseas.

Isidore Newman School in New Orleans, LA

“It didn’t occur to us that we’d end up in the service,” yearbook donor and WWII veteran Tommy Godchaux stated during his oral history. Despite his feelings at the time, the pages of the 1942 Pioneer yearbook from the exclusive Isidore Newman School are chock full of wartime imagery, from the title illustration featuring an armed Uncle Sam carrying a tank and a Higgins Boat landing craft to its advice column for boys and girls. Everything from popular trends to contemporary music is interpreted through the war, including the role students must play in supporting the Allies. The Pioneer also reveals student attitudes toward gender roles in features like “For Girls Only” as well as the school-wide Pioneer Poll, in which 80% of boys and 56% of girls voted against women wearing slacks. In February 1942, with America’s involvement in WWII just three months old, one student ponders “Should we hate our enemies?”

View the full See You Next Year: High School Yearbooks from WWII collection and find out how you can help represent your state!

Posted by Gemma Birnbaum, Digital Education Coordinator at The National WWII Museum.

filson:

When you’re exploring the vast American wilderness, you never know what you’ll find.

filson:

When you’re exploring the vast American wilderness, you never know what you’ll find.

1 2 11

1. What position does your character sleep in? ( i.e; stomach, side, back, etc. ) Describe why they do this — optional.

{{Redwood always sleeps on his side- preferably on the very edge of the bed. Mainly so he’ll hop right outta bed immediately encased of any intruders.}} 

2. Does your character have any noteworthy features? Freckles? Dimples? A scar somewhere unusual? etc.

{{Redwood’s thermal scar is most noticeable.}}

11. What do they think of creation? Do they believe in evolution or do they believe in God? What is their religion like?

{{Redwood strongly believes within God and the Catholic Church. However, he doesn’t throw away the theory of evolution. He understands the important content however, Redwood believes God played an major role.}} 

2, 3,4, I'm picking at random fyi

2. Does your character have any noteworthy features? Freckles? Dimples? A scar somewhere unusual? etc.

{{Redwood has an noteworthy thermal scar from the Great War. This scar developed from an thermal nuclear wave. That resulted from an nuclear detonation.}} 

3. Does your character have an accent? What does it sound like?

{{Most notably Redwood’s accent was always based around Clint Eastwood’s accent and voice.}}

4. Do they have any verbal tics? Do they have trouble pronouncing certain words or getting their thoughts across clearly?

{{Redwood pronounces mostly everything in the English language correctly.  However, when it comes to Chinese or German. Some words might be mispronounced during speech.}} 

IMPERSONATE ME IN MY INBOX I WANNA SEE WHAT YOU GUYS RETAIN FROM ALL MY SHITTY POSTS
21

21. Your character has been granted 3 wishes; what would they wish for and why?

{{Pretty much any wish which Redwood gets. He’s gonna wish the Great War never happened.}}

3, 9!

3. Does your character have an accent? What does it sound like?

{{Redwood’s accent is modeled after this famed actor’s voice.}}  

26

26. How does your character prepare for bed? Do they sleep at all or can they stay awake for days on end without trouble?

{{Redwood’s habits before bed are well-entrenched so to speak. Usually these habits grew around either pre-war times or present outside dangers. Redwood might stay up for a little while longer. This might involve reading a book or even his bible. Afterwards he’ll go around his house and check up on things. Check if the door’s locks are okay and not tampered with. Then he’ll head to get a shower done; which he’ll put on some cleaner clothes.}}

{{His sleeping habits however, aren’t really that well off. Sometimes he’ll get up during the middle of the night. Check around the house some more then head back to bed. His past haunts him during his sleep; nightmares of the Atomic War are still very real to Redwood. Sometimes Redwood’s eyes are wide opened. Something he learned during the Anchorage liberation; since night fighting was rather frequent. This habit was continued even after the war.}}

{{He also sleeps on the very edge. Incased any intruders arrive and break in. Redwood would hear it and respond quickly. Also usually his right hand is underneath his pillow; which underneath that his hand grips onto an pistol.}}

30 Uncommon Character Development Questions ( send me a number )

edhelernil:

  1. What position does your character sleep in? ( i.e; stomach, side, back, etc. ) Describe why they do this — optional.
  2. Does your character have any noteworthy features? Freckles? Dimples? A scar somewhere unusual? etc.
  3. Does your character have an accent? What does it sound like?
  4. Do they have any verbal tics? Do they have trouble pronouncing certain words or getting their thoughts across clearly?
  5. What are their chief tension areas? 
  6. If you were to pick one song — and only one song — to describe your character, what would it be and why?
  7. How does your character perceive themselves? Positive? Negative? Neutral?
  8. Are they a quick thinker or do they need time to sort through their thoughts?
  9. Does your character dream or are their nights filled with an empty blackness? Describe a dream they’ve had or a night they couldn’t sleep and what they did to preoccupy their time.
  10. If they had a choice, would they prefer a subway or a bus for public transportation?
  11. What do they think of creation? Do they believe in evolution or do they believe in God? What is their religion like?
  12. Describe 5 unusual characteristics your muse has.
  13. Have they ever been so overwhelmed they had to stop and take a break from something? 
  14. Are they a team player or do they prefer to be solo?
  15. Can they multi-task or must they focus on one subject at a time?
  16. What are their best school subjects? What are their worst? List five of each.
  17. Is your character an introvert or an extrovert? How do they handle big crowds of people?
  18. Are they a leader, do they prefer to follow, or would they rather just stay on the sidelines altogether?
  19. If your character was suddenly challenged, would they rather run away or stay and fight?
  20. If your character was allowed to murder one person without any consequences, who would that person be and why?
  21. Your character has been granted 3 wishes; what would they wish for and why?
  22. Does your character trust people right off the bat or does it take them some time to warm up to someone?
  23. Do they prefer romance or affection? What is the quickest way to your character’s heart?
  24. Does your character have any enemies? If so, who and why?
  25. Do they have any weird bedroom habits? Any unusual kinks?
  26. How does your character prepare for bed? Do they sleep at all or can they stay awake for days on end without trouble?
  27. If your character had one thing to say to their parents before they died, what would it be?
  28. Are they afraid of death? Do they have any regrets?
  29. Does your character get restless when things are too quiet or do they favour solitude and silence? Why?
  30. Finally; if your character was forced to eat one thing for the rest of their life, what would they choose and why?
demons:

A tank of the 6th Tank Bn. firing on enemy positions near Song Sil-li

demons:

A tank of the 6th Tank Bn. firing on enemy positions near Song Sil-li

rogerwilkerson:

San Diego Zoo

rogerwilkerson:

San Diego Zoo